The Head of the Nail

Some dry nail humor to get our bellows pumpin’:

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(A little trick is sometimes used among some (that would be thought cunning Carpenters) privately to touch the Head of the Nail with a little Ear-wax, and then lay a Wager with a Stranger to the Trick, that he shall not drive that Nail up to the Head with so many blows. The stranger thinks he shall assuredly win, but does assuredly lose; for the Hammer no sooner touches the Head of the Nail but instead of entring the Wood it flies away, notwithstanding his utmost care in striking it down-right.)

From Moxon’s Mechanick Exercises, or The Doctrine of Handyworks 1683. Free download available via Lost Art Press link: http://blog.lostartpress.com/2013/05/13/free-download-joseph-moxons-mechanick-exercises/ Thanks, Chris Schwarz

I mean, who HASN’T pulled this trick at a kegger or an office X-mas party a few times? And ee by gum, what a novel use for ear-wax!

Nails. We love em, common though they may be. We hot dip and galvanize them, we pound them, shoot them from guns, bend them over on themselves to clench them, and adding insult to injury we give them funny and archaic names like Stainless Ringshanks and 8-Penny. They’re relatively cheap, they come in convenient packages, and they are ubiquitous.

They’re wicked easy to take for granted.

But have you ever REALLY thought about the humble nail? Have you gone on a Wayne’s World flashback to when they were actually forged one at a time by a smith on an anvil? Have you considered how wonderful it would be to be able to make your perfect little (or not so little) pieces of hardware to compliment and personalize your project?

Have you ever wanted to forge your own nails?

Here’s your chance–

Text and photos from Plymouth CRAFT’S link:

Nailmaking with George Pare

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Nails are some of the easiest things to forge yet they can take a lifetime to perfect. In this one-day workshop, blacksmith George Paré will teach participants to forge a wide variety of nails for aesthetic and practical applications, or for use in restoration projects.

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The forging of nails is an ideal form of training for building hammer control and muscle memory as a blacksmith.  One can easily see his or her progress as a smith by comparing nails made over months and years forging.  The satisfaction of making one nail is soon replaced by that of watching a pile of them grow beside the anvil.

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This workshop is open to individuals of all skill levels and forging ability. It will be conducted in the Sellars/Demoranville Blacksmith Shop located at the Freetown Historical Society, itself an exceptional cultural resource. We will take advantage of the unique setting to learn a little bit about local craft history, which happens to be quite rich in iron.

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Discover for yourself the satisfaction of driving nails that you forged by hammer and hand.

Lunch is included in the participant fee.

In keeping with the theme of the day, it will be cooked onsite using cast and wrought iron utensils, over a charcoal fire.

Me again. There you have it. What the fine print doesn’t tell you is that George is super friendly, incredibly talented, and a wonderful teacher. (He also teaches kite-boarding, but we’ll let him tell you about that). Also, you remember Paula Marcoux, of Cooking with Fire fame. She will be working the fire to make something amazing, guaranteed. This aint a pizza & soda kinda workshop, folks. In meeting both George and Paula, you will have made two lifelong friends. Last but not least, you will be soaking in the history of an unspoiled and culturally rich part of southeastern Massachusetts through The Freetown Historical Society’s forge. Did I mention that it’s only a stones throw to the best sawmill/lumberyard on the eastern seaboard? If you work wood and you haven’t been to Gurney’s Sawmill, you need to change that.

BLUE OAK apologizes for the hard sell…but not really. These folks are talented and dedicated craftspeople and teachers–the best at what they do, really. They aren’t in it for the money and they aren’t in it for the Twitter follows. They are sincerely devoted to traditional arts, restoration, and handcraft and to sharing that knowledge and skill with you. It’s a lot of money to many of us. Understood. But if you can afford it, it’s a fair price for a learned skill, great contacts, and new friends.

It’s up to you now.

But ladies and gentlemen please, leave the ear-wax at home.

The Details:

Date: July 26

Time: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Cost: $175

The Place:

Freetown Historical Society

1 Slab Bridge Road

Assonet, MA 02702 USA

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To register and for more information, pound the link below like a hammer pounds a nail:

http://plymouthcraft.org/?tribe_events=nailmaking-with-george-pare

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11 thoughts on “The Head of the Nail

  1. Kinderhook88 says:

    I’m originally from Massachusetts (Arlington to be specific), and you folks sure have me thinking about moving back there. Or at least, taking a long vacation 🙂

    • Rick says:

      You just let us know, Michael. Things have changed up here since you’ve been gone, however. Don’t swim with the seals off of Plymouth and Cape Cod anymore…

      • Kinderhook88 says:

        I’ve been gone for over 30 years, but I still love the “feel” of New England when I’m there. The old saying is true – “you can’t go home again”. I’ve never been much on swimming in the ocean in any case 🙂

  2. Old time Cologne, Germany, drinking game – do a shot, drive a nail – etc. Gets more interesting when they start demanding you use the cross peen; 🙂

  3. Hey Rik,

    Can you ship me over a couple of sacks of those nails, please? I’m going to be busy making loadsa oak boxes after being with Mr Folansbee for a week at Bridgwater College.

  4. George says:

    Wow, what a writer you are Rick. I wish I had a quarter of your literary skill. Thank you for this blog entry and that great introduction. I hadn’t seen it until now.

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